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Assignment Questions

Does the national culture in which our political system operates, influence the agenda of our political parties, or is it the agenda of the political parties which, influences our national culture?

Does the national culture in which our political system operates, influence the agenda of our political parties, or is it the agenda of the political parties which, influences our national culture?
It is possible that both our national culture and the agenda of political of our major parties influence one another, but it is more likely that one has more influence over the other. That is say, the overall issues we as a nation are concerned about make-up the platform of debate between the two major parties, but it is more likely that we are more ?politically? concerned about issues that are established by the political parties? agendas. For example if you were to ask your neighbor what he or she was most concerned about these days, they would mostly make a reference to their job or retirement benefits. Both major political parties have some portion their domestic platform to focus on the creation of jobs, but the bulk of their agenda focus on foreign affairs and policy.

Understanding whether political agendas set the national culture or whether the national culture set political agendas, is important in determining if our system truly is a ?representative democracy?. Understanding this phenomenon also helps understand why politicians take certain positions on issues. As politicians increasingly try to divide this nation into groups based on issues, we must ask ourselves whose issues are these? Are these issues what we really care about? This article proposes to answer these questions by examining and comparing issues that are most central to the average citizens to those which are politicized by candidates and the media.

Bibliography

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