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Assignment Questions

Report o Coca Cola

This report needs to be done on the Coca Cola Company. APA format needs to be done throughout the report including the references page.
you will state one organizational goal that has been adopted by your course project organization or that you propose for adoption given the organization’s stated strategy. Next, select and defend your analytical approach. Then, research and write your analysis.

Click on the Project tab for complete details on the course project.

Procedure
1.State one organizational goal that has been adopted by your course project organization or that you propose for adoption given the organization’s stated strategy.
2.Next, select and defend a specific analytical approach to studying the organization.
3.Organize, research, and write your analysis. Include definitions, where appropriate, tables and/or graphs, comparisons, contrasts, measurements, and computations that reflect analytical thinking (as opposed to mere description). Please review Theme 4’s ?Bloom’s Taxonomy Meets BBA305.? Your analysis should be no more than four pages.

Benjamin Bloom’s taxonomy of degrees of thinking can help you determine when you have erred too far in the direction of displaying levels 1 and 2 thinking skills. The rubrics below provide specific action words that can help you write a purposeful, specific, and insightful deliverable at higher levels of thinking. Study the instructional words at each level in this taxonomy.

By Level of Thinking?

Bloom’s Taxonomy Meets BBA305

Level 1: Basic Knowledge, Awareness

Skills Demonstrated

?Observation and recall of information
?Knowledge of dates, events, places
?Knowledge of major ideas

Computational

Visual

Expository

Question

Cues:

Identify, show, label, collect, when, where, find

Question Cues:

Examine, tabulate, name, describe, draw

Question Cues:

List, define, tell, describe, quote, name, who, when, where, postulate

Level 2: Comprehension

Skills Demonstrated

?Grasp meaning
?Interpret, compare, contrast facts
?Order, group, infer causes
?Predict consequences
?Correct use of concepts, theories, and methods from readings

Computational

Visual

Expository

Question

Cues:

Estimate, predict, contrast, associate, differentiate

Question Cues:

Interpret, contrast, draw, demon-strate

Question Cues:

Interpret, predict, contrast, discuss, extend

Level 3: Application

Skills Demonstrated

?Use information
?Use of concepts, theories in new situations
?Solve problems using required skills or knowledge

Computational

Visual

Expository

Question

Cues:

Apply, demonstrate, calculate, show, solve, change, experiment

Question Cues:

Demon-strate, illustrate, show, modify, classify

Question Cues:

Demonstrate, complete, illustrate, examine, modify, relate, classify, discover

Level 4: Analysis

Skills Demonstrated

?Identify patterns, organize parts
?Recognize hidden meanings
?Identify components
?Use quantitative methods from, e.g., statistics, accounting
?Use of methods in new situations

Computational

Visual

Expository

Question

Cues:

Order, arrange, connect, multiply, divide; infer; perform mathematical and/or logical operations

Question Cues:

Separate, order, arrange, connect, classify, compare, select

Question Cues:

Analyze, separate, order, arrange, explain, infer

Level 5: Synthesis

Skills Demonstrated

?Generalize from given facts
?Relate knowledge from several areas
?Show relevance of supplemental research
?Show derivation of conclusion(s)

Computational

Visual

Expository

Question

Cues:

Integrate, rearrange, substitute, plan, formulate

Question Cues:

Combine, create, design, invent, compose

Question Cues:

Plan, create, design, invest, compose, prepare, generalize, deduce

Level 6: Evaluation

Skills Demonstrated

?Compare and contrast ideas
?Assess value of theories, evidence, presentations
?Make choices based on reasoned argument
?Recognize subjectivity

Computational

Visual

Expository

Question

Cues:

Rank, grade, measure, prove, compare, contrast

Question Cues:

Rank, discriminate, compare, contrast

Question Cues:

Assess, decide, recommend, convince, select, judge, explain, discriminate, support, conclude, compare, contrast

When it comes to applying Bloom’s Taxonomy, allow sufficient time to conduct more research and re-phrase sentences in order to produce a more rigorous paper. Consider the five paired contrasts below:

Example 1. Reducing the use of raw materials will help the company to save money.

Level of thinking: 1, descriptive

Reducing the use of raw materials reduces the marginal cost of production, thus resulting in a higher gross profit.

Level of thinking: 3, analytical?the result of using financial statement classifications to make an informed judgment (Level of thinking: 6, evaluation). Note the use of BBA305 vocabulary: ?reduces the marginal cost of production? versus (the more colloquial and non-specific) ?save money.?

Example 2. The government program was designed to help widows, orphans, and invalids.

Level of thinking: 1, a descriptive list

The government program provided income support first to invalids (who receive 60% of all transfer payments), then widows and orphans (25% and 15%, respectively, of all transfer payments.

Level of thinking: 6, evaluation and ranking, by literally finding the ?value? of the payment percentages for each group. Note also that the extra research, as shown with the use of specific data, allows a change in ranking according to size or share. In terms of diction, ?income support? and ?transfer payments? replace ?help? (which is too vague).

Example 3. The organization experienced rapid sales growth in the previous inflationary environment.

Level of thinking: 2, prediction of a microeconomic consequence (?rapid sales growth?) based on a characteristic of the macroeconomy (high general price level or ?inflationary environment?).

The organization experienced rapid sales growth in the inflationary environment, thanks to the price-inelastic demand for its products.

Level of thinking: 3, analytical, i.e., the use, and not mere naming, of course concepts.

Level of thinking: 4, synthesis, by combining concepts (?inflationary environment? and ?price-inelastic demand?) to support the explanation for ?rapid sales growth.?

Example 4. The marketing campaign led to an increase in demand.

Level of thinking: 2, draw, demonstrate

The market for product X

The marketing campaign led to an increase in demand, while output remained constant.

The market for product X

Level of thinking: 6, making a comparison, visually by stating what happened based on the full model (i.e., based on demand and supply). The added information about supply means that quantity did not increase, as would be the case for the generic, sloped curves of the basic supply and demand model. A prior knowledge about supply provides us with a way to determine the importance of the marketing campaign. The conclusion? The marketing plan led to an increase in the price of the product–as opposed to more sales–because company managers did not authorize an increase in supply of the product.

Example 5. The average sales level for the group over the past five years has been $3 million per year.

Level of thinking: 1, descriptive

The average sales level for the group over the past five years has been $3 million per year, or $175,000 per employee during the period.

Level of thinking: 4, analytical?divide the number of employees for each year into sales for each year, then take the average for the five-year period.

Level of thinking: 6, evaluation, with an emphasis on the value of the statistic (as opposed to the value of sales per employee only). Ratios provide comparisons. In this case, dividing by the number of employees is a way of ?measuring? or contextualizing sales.

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