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Assignment Questions

The War Poetry

Text:
Craig, A. et al. (2009). The heritage of world civilizations, brief edition, Vol II(8th ed.). Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
Rubenstein, R. & Larson, C. (2002). Worlds of fiction (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
Readings:
• Roberts, D. “The End of the First World War.” The War Poetry Website. 2009. David Roberts, Web. 04 Sep 2009. . This is an extract from chapter 10 of a book titled Minds at War, an anthology of poetry of the First World War by David Roberts.
• “The Value of Holocaust Poetry in Education.” Teaching the Legacy 2006: n. pag. Web. 03 Sep 2009. . This article explores how poetry can be used by educators to teach and commemorate the Holocaust.
• Zuelow, E. “What is Nationalism?.” The Nationalism Project. 2007. Nationalism Studies Information Clearinghouse, Web. 01 Sep 2009. .
The Nationalism Project is one of the most widely used nationalism studies resources on the Internet and provides users with a clearinghouse of scholarly nationalism information including: leading definitions of nationalism, book reviews, web links, subject bibliographies, a bibliography of more than 2,000 journal articles, and much more
Readings
1. Read the following sections from: The Heritage of World Civilizations:
o Chapter 24, “Political Consolidation in Nineteenth-Century Europe and North America, 1815-1880”: The chapter first focuses on several things including: the relationship between nationalism and liberalism, the economic development in the North and South of the United States, the reconstruction period that followed the Civil War, Germany at the turn of the 19th century and the notions behind anti-Semitism.
o Chapter 25, “Northern Transatlantic Economy and Society, 1815-1914”: This chapter discusses the century from 1815 to 1914, during which Europe’s social and economic institutions. It concludes with a summary of Islamic thought in late the nineteenth century and how it coped with the economic, philosophical, and political changes taking place.
2. Who are we? What does it mean to be a human being? Are our concerns so different from those who lived before us? Pick two (2) stories from Worlds of Fiction that concern human nature. Also, read two (2) of the following selections:
o Tillie Olsen, “I Stand Here Ironing”
o Isaac Singer, “Gimpel the Fool”
o Nathaniel Hawthorne, “The Birthmark”
o Arnost Lustig, “The Lemon”
The readings for the week are diverse and drawn from a variety of literary forms. They focus on themes such as self doubt, acceptance and belonging and hopelessness.
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Recommended Readings
1. Leddy, C. (2006). Con games: literary fraud has a long history. The Writer, 119(8), 8 – 10. In his article, Chuck Leddy explores various aspects of literary fraud, some of the more recognizable cases and its effect on historiographical perceptions. (see attached)
2. Zuelow, E. “What is Nationalism?.” The Nationalism Project. 2007. Nationalism Studies Information Clearinghouse, Web. 01 Sep 2009. . The Nationalism Project is one of the most widely used nationalism studies resources on the Internet and provides users with a clearinghouse of scholarly nationalism information including: leading definitions of nationalism, book reviews, web links, subject bibliographies, a bibliography of more than 2,000 journal articles, and much more.
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Multi-Media
1. Watch the video entitled The Charge of the Light Brigade located at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBeykfVEj6A. This documentary on the Charge of the Light Brigade includes graphic quotes from survivors, and the original recording of Alfred Tennyson reading part of his famous poem. Written and narrated by Terry Brighton for The Queen’s Royal Lancers Regimental Museum.

Discussion 1.1
Provide a brief summary, in 250-300 words, of the relationship between history and literature by answering the following questions. What is the relationship between history and literature? Is one subordinate to the other? What can we learn, for example, from the stories you read (be specific)? Does knowledge of history make a story more powerful, more “real?” Does history create literature and, in turn, literature creates history?

Discussion 1.2
Reread the document entitled “Lord Acton Condemns Nationalism” on page 769 of The Heritage of World Civilizations and construct a 250-300 word post answering the questions: Why does Acton see the principle of nationality as dangerous to liberty? Why does he see nationalism as a threat to minority groups? Can you give a relatively recent historical example of the actuation of Lord Acton’s fears?

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