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Assignment Questions

Utopia Dytopia

Did science/technology bring us to a better or worse perception of our world?

Technological and scientific discoveries have provided us with many positive advancements, such as a higher standard of living and a longer life expectation; however, innovation in science and technology has also led to the creation of weapons of mass destruction capable of destroying the world.

Thesis: Advances in science and technology from the late 18th century to the 21st century have contributed to a less utopian and growing dystopian worldview.

Fist a clear understanding of the words utopia and dystopia is essential, including a further look into their etymology.

III. Contrast of Utopia and dystopia in society
A.During the late 19th century divergences between utopia and dystopia became more visible in literature.

a. The Begum’s Millions by Jules Verne is one example of the first modern dystopian publication inspired by the electrical revolution.

1. In The Begum’s Millions (1879), Verne’s view on science and technology is sinister and suggests a dystopian narration.
a. utopic and dystopic are both interested in the eletrical revolution.
b. However two schools of thoughts develop ( utopic and dystopic. )

2. The war of the air By H.G. Wells forsees air raids that would actually happen in the World War.
a. inspired by the first aorplane flight
b. re[resent dysto[ic school of thought
B. Twentieth century, ideological dystopian themes continued to be woven tightly together as they emerge with the advancement of the Great War—Word Wars
a. The Iron Hell by Jack London (1909):

b. The World Set Free By H. G. Wells (1914), known as the first prophesy of a nuclear The catastrophe of the atomic bombs which shook men out of cities and businesses and economic relations, shook them also out of their old-established habits of thought, and out of the lightly held beliefs and prejudices that came down to them from the pastexplosion resulting in the destruction of civilization.
H. G. Wells’s work in Utopia versa dystopia

IV. Technology held in the wrong hands destroys a previous utopian worldview, forming a dystopian school of thought.
Brave New World by Aldour Huxley (1932)
Depicts a failed paradise in which mass culture and technologic abuse rule Scientific concepts loom large (e.g., designer drugs, cloning)

The peak of dystopian thought: The World Wars
Bybernetics: Control communication in the Animal and the Machine by Nubert Wienter (1948)
Scientifically speaking human beings become machines.
1984 by George Orwell (1949)
Most classic example of dystopia in literature
Intellectual integrity in dystopian fiction
An anti-totalitarian dystopia through politics

Conclusion:
Retraction of thesis statement: “Thesis: Advances in science and technology from the late 18th century to the 21st century have contributed to a less utopian and growing dystopian worldview.”
Destruction of utopian images by the technological/scientific revolutions
Dystopian thought continue to permeate our society today
Final statement: Did science/technology bring us to a better or worse perception of our world?

More printed sources:
A brief history of science, by Rupert Hall & Marie Boas Hall, published by the New American Library in 1964.
The History of Mr. Polly by H. G. Wells, Longman edition of 1959.
George Orwell by John Atkins, printed by Calder & Boyards London. Reprint of 1954.
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, published by Airmont Publishing Co., Inc.
H. G. Wells bibliography by Vincent Brome(1951), published by Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co.

Book sources:
Utopia by Thomas More, (1515)
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1869) and The Begum’s Millions by Jules Verne.
The War of the Worlds and The World Set Free by H. G.. Wells (1914)
The Iron Hell by Jack London (1909)
Bybernetics: Control communication in the Animal and the Machine by Nubert Wienter (1948)
1984 by George Orwell (1949)
Brave New World by Aldour Huxley (1932)
and any other free acessable internet sources.
such as wikipedia.com

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